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True Stories

How We First Met #3: Eric Scaggiante and Cinelli Vigorelli “Vigorosa”

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Eric Scaggiante is a Milan-based fashion and street photographer as well as proud owner of the Vigorelli Vigorosa (his first track bike) and the world’s youngest ever finisher of the legendary unsupported endurance Silk Road Mountain Race.

We sat down with him in Milan and asked him about how him and Vigorosa met and what cycling has meant to him culturally over the last ten years.

 

If I’m a photographer today it’s thanks to my passion for cycling, which was the first important passion of my life.

I grew up in Spinea, a small town near Venice, and always loved cycling. As a kid for me it was a first taste of independence, and of speed.

But my real passion started in around 2013 when I first discovered the world of alley cat races and fixed gear bikes which at that moment, in Italy at least, were in full boom. I was initiated into this world by the ragazzi of TrueHardcoreCycle (THC).

After discovering this world I immediately started looking to buy a track bike for myself. One day on Subito [an Italian second-hand listings website – ED] I came across a listing for a Cinelli Vigorelli Vigorosa for sale in Treviso, fully-built up, for only €560! A real deal! I was so excited I immediately counted up all my savings from little jobs I’d done and sold anything I owned that had value and managed to scrape together the money to buy it.

 

 

I can still remember how much fun I had on that bike… I rode it everywhere, so much so that my first – and probably only – nickname was “Vigo”.”

 

 

Among the most important races I rode with my Vigorelli I remember in particular my first Respvblica, Italy’s greatest fixed gear hill-bombing race, organized around Genova by SCVDO.

Through this scene and its races I subsequently met another a cyclist called Cesare Pedrini, from Bologna, who at the time was preparing to ride the Transcontinental Race on a fixed-gear. Through him I discovered another new cycling world: unsupported ultra-cycling.

To cut a very long story short I too became interested in ultra-cycling and in 2019 shortly after graduating from high school I flew to Kyrgyzstan where I celebrated my 19th birthday alone in a hotel room and two days later set off to ride the Silk Road Mountain Race. The race was my personal chimera, the single most beautiful, challenging, intense experience of my life. I completed the race becoming the youngest ever finisher and, upon my return to Italy, started my first job, at 3T in Bergamo.

With my first paycheck I bought a camera and from there discovered a new passion. Soon after I quit and began my career as a photographer… But the genesis of everything was the purchase of my Vigorelli Vigorosa for €560 in 2014!

Discover more about the upcoming release of the newly redesigned version of the legendary original “Vigorosa” paint scheme.

CLICK HERE to receive access to purchase the limited edition frame before its public release!

How We First Met #2: Jobst Brandt and Cino Cinelli

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Jobst Brandt (1935-2015) was one of cycling’s most influential outsiders and inspiring explorers.

A pioneer of riding road bikes off road, he led legendary ‘Jobst rides’, which, years before the evolution of mountain bikes and gravel bikes, took cyclists like Tom Ritchey, Gary Fisher and Eric Heiden deep into the trails of the Santa Cruz Mountains as well as developing meticulously innovative solutions for the modern cycling such as treadles tyres and the first bicycle computer.

Thanks to our old friend and contributor to Cinelli: the Art and Design of the Bicycle, Max Leonard we recently discovered that Brandt was a passionate customer of Cinelli’s framebuilding department throughout the 1950s, 60s and 70s, purchasing at least six bikes over these three decades as well as taking priceless photos of the factory and Cino. Because of Brandt’s longstanding passion for using road bicycles offroad, Cino’s own familiarity with these surfaces from his days as a professional in the heroic 30s and 40s we were extremely curious to discover more about the technical dialogue and relationship between these two very different, very opinionated innovators of the modern racing bicycle and how it might relate to gravel cycling innovation today.

Below are notes and photographs from Max’s soon to be published book on Brandt for which you can pre-order a copy and support the project HERE.

 

Throughout the course of his life Jobst also spent almost fifty summers in the Alps, lightweight touring and adventuring over 2,000 miles each time, always carrying a camera to document his trip. On his first Alps ride, in 1959, he paid a visit to the Swiss tyre manufacturer Sieber, who persuaded him to swap to wooden rims (Jobst’s tubular glue was melting on his Fiamme alloy rims on the long Alpine descents).
Then Jobst headed to see Cino Cinelli.

“The next morning with tires glued and wheels true,” Jobst wrote in his journal, I thanked Mr Sieber for all his help and rolled on to Milano where I stopped at the train station and got rid of some extra clothes into the suitcase. I headed east across town on the via Andrea Doria and via Porpora to Lambrate, to via Egidio Folli 45 where the Cinelli factory is located, producing bicycles, bars, and stems at a great rate. Mr Cinelli’s office lies next to a branch of the Lambro river that is apparently a main sewer outfall”.


“I found a sharp contrast with the surroundings and the buzzing thriving factory that was producing such elegant machinery. Mrs Cinelli briefly mentioned her days at Sieber, and that she had been his secretary for years when a young bicycle racer from the Toscana, who dropped in for equipment on occasion, offered her his hand. Cino looked at my bicycle and how it fit me and said that he would do something about that tomorrow after giving it some thought”.

“In the morning he had me ride around the yard a few times and then raised the saddle a bit and moved it forward. He put his newest model 360mm extra wide bars with deep reach on a 120mm stem, placing the brake levers in a better position. Down below I got the newest Campagnolo crank spindle and 180mm five-pin Cinelli (Magistroni) steel cranks that finally gave me true running chainwheels in contrast to the previous three pin style. He was disturbed by my choice of wooden rims and tried to get me back on Fiamme aluminum but I didn’t take.”

 

 

 

“I had asked Mr Cinelli what the greatest road in the Alps was, to which he replied without hesitation, the Stelvio, but that I might not like it because it was unpaved.

That especially caught my interest so here I was heading up the Valtellina at Tirano where the road to the foot of this great pass starts its climb.”

 

 

The bike Jobst was riding on this trip was a 62cm blue Cinelli Super Corsa, ordered from Spence Wolf’s bike shop in Cupertino, California.

Jobst ordered one such frame in 1957 and one in 1958. After the 1959 Alp tour, Jobst took a job at Porsche in Stuttgart, where he translated the manual to the 356 and later worked on race car suspension. From his new European home he visited Cinelli again on his Alps tour in 1960, and then throughout the 1960s and 70s.

In 1962 he ordered a Super Corsa direct from Cino, and in 1964 he took his new wife Helga on a tour of the Alps, during which they stopped off at Cinelli to pick up a matching frame for her (which she still owns). They also dined with Cino and family in his private apartment. Helga’s bike features a very early set of vertical rear dropouts, which had been designed and manufactured by Jobst; later, he claimed Cinelli must have passed these to Campagnolo and that they became the model for Campagnolo’s own.

Back in the USA after he married, he would go on to order at least another Cinelli from Spence Wolf in Cupertino, in 1971, and kept up a correspondence with Cino into the 1970s.

After meeting and riding with Tom Ritchey, who was building fillet-brazed road frames while he was still in high school in the 1970s, Jobst began riding a Ritchey frame, and ended his riding life on a frame built another California builder, Peter Johnson.

All in all, Jobst owned at least six Cinelli frames. None of them survive: as a 6’5″ rider who liked to ride on dirt, he was hard on frames and components, often cracking, shearing or denting what he rode.
He was not shy of pointing out what he saw as manufacturing defects even to master builders like Cino Cinelli!

Pre-order your copy of Jobst Brandt: Ride Bike!   HERE 

Discover more about the history and contemporary practice of Cinelli steel framebuilding  HERE

How We First Met #1: Anton’s Vigorelli

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Anton Kuznetzov aka @antonbentframe is a young Russian ramen chef living in St Petersburg.

Earlier this year a video of him executing a “fish and chips” underneath the security barrier of a car park – that is sliding his bicycle and torso in a 360° rotation, what he calls a “normal trick” – became a viral sensation, evoking the ultimate, original, dream of urban track bike riding i.e. the ability to seamlessly adapt in motion to any obstacle whatsoever with perfect composure.

The bike ridden by Anton in this video was a 2016 Cinelli Vigorelli Alu. We called up Anton to ask him more about himself and how Vigorelli and him first met.

 

 

 

 

I started cycling in 2014. My first bike was a track bike Fuji steel track frame. I started riding because I wanted to do tricks and track bikes were popular in St Petersburg.

I immediately got hooked on riding track and for two years I even became a full time messenger.

The first time I saw a Cinelli trackbike was also in 2014, on a video on the internet.
In 2020 I finally bought my own Cinelli Vigorelli through a friend who got it on the blackmarket in Europe and brought it back to Russia.

In Russia it’s hard to buy Cinelli, it was hard then, even harder now… but I wanted  the Vigorelli because of its history, its design and the geometry which for me was perfect.
I was so excited to finally own it! 

 

 

 

These days I am riding my Vigorelli everywhere not just because I like it but for a more important reason: to avoid the police.

A month ago I received my mobilization papers to join the army but I don’t want to have anything to do with this war which only Putin wants.

If you ride the metro or walk around main areas there is always police asking for your documents. On my bike I stay free and off the radar.

 

 

I have taken this bike around Russia racing alleycats in different cities, people always comment on the frame.

In the whole of St Petersburg there are about 25 Cinelli bikes.
Often all the owners meet up and ride together… St Petersburg is the cultural capital of Russia and today has maybe the biggest track bike scene.
My guess is that there are about 500 people on the streets currently riding track bikes.

Riding on the streets here is intense, racing against crazy Russian drivers…

 

 

 

My usual set up for the Vigorelli is 43×15 gearing (I just switched from 48×17) with Enve carbon riser bars (15mm rise, 680mm wide) and Vans cult grips for everyday use.

I love these bars and set ups for everyday riding, alleycats and tricks; I’m comfortable, have maximum control of the bike and can achieve a good fit. That said I am now looking to buy some 40mm carbon drop bars for short drag races where an aerodynamic position is advantageous.

When I have to ride mudguards I used a rollable from Mudguard company. Seatpost and stem are Thomson.
Wheelset is cheap because tricks often break bearings or rims.

Other interesting parts: Zodiak moscon chainring and cog, Izumi-Mash chain and a titanium top cap from Oh Sweet Ghetto… drop bars for racing. 

Follow our instagram profile @cinelli_official for more adventures and original stories!

And if you are curious about the Vigorelli frame, check out our website and stay updated because we might be having something special for you in the next weeks!

Pictures: Anton Seleznev

trick track bikes antonbentframe

My first UCI race

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What happens when two Milanese messengers pin on a race number for the first time at Italy’s first ever UCI-sanctioned gravel race, Monsterrato?

 

 

Several weeks ago two young Milanese messengers and friends Chloe Mazza and Pietro De Giacomo, came and visited at our HQ in Caleppio, outskirts of Milan.

Both Chloe and Pietro are fast, both ride cargo bikes for work, both are extremely active in local messenger-organized races around Milan and both ride Cinelli track bikes when not on their work bikes: Pietro an ultra-rare Cinelli x MASH CX ss that he found on subito.it last year for less than €700 (!), Chloe a 2019 Vigorelli Steel “black night” edition (her first ever “real” bike).

 

 

 

 

 

Together we discussed the possibility of them pinning on a number at Italy’s first ever UCI-sanctioned gravel race, Monsterrato and trying to achieve a “fairytale” qualification for the Gravel World Championships.

Both were more than up for the challenge.

We signed them to Circolo Ciclistico Cinelli-Iuter our “informal” team, open to anybody with same attitude as us, we gave them a team jersey, gear and bikes: Made in Italy steel Nemo Gravel for Pietro, carbon fiber Zydeco King for Chloe.

With only a few days of proper riding to get used to their new equipment Pietro and Chloe set off to the race with our team “manager” Cappe and Charlie, his vintage T3 Volkswagen van.

Of the race – their first ever “serious” race – both said much the same thing: the atmosphere was very different, the adrenaline of the mass start together with elite athletes is a kick unique to the sport of cycling but the speed, despite an enormous amount of kilometres in their legs this season, was just too much and very soon the dream of qualifying for the world championships evaporated and both were left to enjoy a different kind of challenge, with themselves and against a particularly technical course.

 

 

 

 

At the end of the race we asked Chloe what the biggest difference between this race and the Italian Cycle Messenger Championship less than a month ago and we found the answer pretty illuminating:

“The biggest difference is that the point of a messenger championship is to race but also to meet people and to learn new skills and techniques for messenger cycling, like how to strap objects to your cargo or discover strange, exotic, custom made components…”

 

Would they race another UCI race? Maybe yes, maybe not, it was a good experience, it was fun, it was intense, it was crazy!

The first few kilometres in the pack, covered in dust with only a few metres of visibility were unforgettable but when cycling becomes racing it also loses a lot of the values that they find so interesting…

 

 

 

 

Follow our instagram profile @cinelli_official for more adventures!

And if you are curious, check out the King Zydeco and the Nemo Gravel that Chloe and Pietro used for the race!

Photos: Luca Panegatti

Road to Badlands 2022

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Riders from all over the world are preparing for Badlands, one of the most famous long distance unsupported races in the Spanish desert.
We put together a team of four riders to compete, explore or just take a “sadistic holiday” in this already mythical race.
Scroll down to get to know our friends Taylor Phinney, Luisa Werner, Sophie Jail and Davide Belfiore.

 

TAYLOR PHINNEY

 

 

Since retiring as a professional cyclist in 2019 Taylor Phinney, laid-back and soft-spoken, has combined the experience of his ten very intense and varied years as a pro with his creativity and broader interest in culture to develop what we think are some of the most interesting ideas in the “industry”.

 

Hi Taylor!

Hi Lodovico!

So first question is really can you just please tell us about how the idea came about for geometry and build of the custom Cinelli Nemo Gravel we just sent out to you?

There are a couple of directions I could take answering this question…

Tell us both!

Well firstly over the last 5-6 years I have started seeing the bicycle as an explorative tool, whilst when I started riding it was a tool for success and for winning. For me the relationship with the bike as a piece of equipment now is: where can it take me AND where can I take it. I like the concept of underbiking i.e. taking a bike that is not technically really up to the terrain you’re riding on. I like to find a balance between how far I can push the bike, how deep into some weird trail I can go before either the bike explodes or I mentally explode.

Ok…

And secondly, from a technical point of view I believe that gravel cycling as we know it today is essentially a continuation of late 80s early 90s mountain bikes. Those bikes were also totally rigid and had a similar tyre profile. But one thing I think is missing or wrong about the current gravel market is that for whatever reason it seems that people just want to make road bikes with big tyres. That’s fine if you want to ride a road bike with big tyres… but when I think of doing a really long adventure or mixed terrain ride I want to be comfortable and a lot of that comfort stems from my upper body position, how straight is my back, how open are my shoulders… For open terrain and steep trails but even asphalt you need to be able to be dynamic, and I find that the strictly road position, very bent over and very far over the front wheel is very unhealthy for my back – with which I have a lot of problems because I’m a giant! – but also from a safety point of view. The further back you are, the easier it is to save the bike if you lose the front wheel. So to cut a long story short the geometry I worked on with the Cinelli technical office was less of a performance fit than your standard model and something closer to an 80s-90s MTB geometry. This is the second bike I’ve tried to develop this idea on and the first custom bike I’ve ever had in entire cycling career despite many promises from previous sponsors! All I ever wanted my whole pro career was a custom frame. It’s only taken about 3 years of not being a pro to have it…

And how does it ride?

Not perfect, but pretty close! [Laughs] I’ve been working on different setups these last few weeks. I’ve ridden it as a mullet bike, with 700c wheel at the front at 650b at the back, I’ve tried a few different handlebars…

Are you ready for Badlands?

To be honest riding Badlands was Davide’s [Cinelli’s trade marketing manager – ED] idea and I just said yeah sure. Only last week I looked at some videos and though oh f**k what have I got myself into… I’m going to take it like a kind of sadistic vacation: 4 or 5 days with no zoom calls no business to attend to. All you have to do is ride your bike and take care of your contact points. It’s total simplicity: stay alive and stay happy.

Haha sounds like a great holiday! One more question: I saw the poster you put out for your social ride with Cinelli this weekend (28/08) in Girona and I noticed that the most prominent piece of information on it (and on other posters you have made in the past for rides) was “100% ego-less ride”. When I read that myself personally as well as others in the office that saw it were really excited, to us it felt like exactly the kind of message we’d like about a ride we’d go on. Can you tell me a little bit about how you came to use this description of your rides?

I think it’s important to let people know up front when they’re coming to any kind of group ride what the vibe is going to be. The reason I write it is because there’s something about men mounting their bicycle and being around other men that makes them feel like they need prove themselves. There can often be this kind of energy where people become immediately competitive because they assume others there are being competitive with them. And it’s that kind of energy that really pushed me away from the road cycling environment. To me it felt like people weren’t connecting with each other but isolating themselves. That’s not the purpose of the bike for me. So I try to make it really clear from the start that this competitive mentality isn’t really welcome and that the people who come to the ride won’t be subject to that.

 

 

LUISA WERNER

 

 

After a brief sojourn as a semi-professional cyclist and, before that, a budding career as an elite rower, last year Luisa Werner began exploring a new kind of cycling: endurance races. This very quickly led to competitive success with victories at prestigious races such as the Italy Divide and Three Peaks. But competition is only a very small part of Luisa Werner’s interest in cycling!

 

Hi Luisa!

Hi Lodovico!

So, I wondered if you could begin by telling us how you first got involved in cycling?

Yes sure! So when I was younger I was a competitive rower, representing Germany at a U23 level. I started riding a road bike, like a lot of rowers and other athletes as a way of helping to build endurance. But soon enough the bike became about going out on long day rides, doing bikepacking trips using Airbnb in its early days… This eventually led to me stopping my rowing career and signing with a small semi-professional German cycling team.

How was your experience as a professional cyclist?

To be honest whilst I loved being with the girls and meeting other athletes I never felt comfortable, was often afraid of crashing and pretty quickly discovered that the peloton was not the side of cycling I’m interested in exploring. I rode for the team for just 1.5 years.

And after this you discovered endurance/bikepacking races?

About two years ago I discovered these kinds of races, yes and in September 2021 I rode my first one.

What attracted you about this format of cycling compared to your experiences as a professional?

Basically at an endurance race nobody goes home a loser. It’s not about position and ranking but adventure and the journey. People have a different spirit. You don’t feel competitiveness in the atmosphere, you feel people doing it for themselves and for the memories that will be created.

You’ve been very successful though, from a competitive point of view, from the very start in these races. What is your attitude towards winning and your objectives for Badlands?

The first priority for me is always to race against myself, not the others, because if do my best that will produce the best ranking. But like I said for me it’s not just a race but an opportunity to talk to the riders around me and to be pushed by them to try to do new things. In fact it’s the atmosphere created by the other riders that put me in the spirit of going fast.

Ok! Last question: you are of course going to be riding the Cinelli Zydeco King gravel bike for the race but are there any other special technical details that you have prepared for the race and that you are excited about using?

Well I am very excited about my mattress (laughs), the Thermarest Neoair X-Lite which I have used in every race over the last two years… And also a new 3 liter bladder bag made by Decathlon that can be placed under my aero-bar extensions to allow me to carry more water…

 

 

SOPHIE JAIL

 

 

Sophie Jail is a nomadic French adventurer with a passion for bikepacking and restoring vintage cars and mopeds. After a long “informal” history with bikes, as a commuter and occasional summer tourer, two years ago she bought her first serious bicycle and began properly bikepacking across the European summer.

 

Hi Sophie!

Hi Lodovico!

So, last time we spoke you told me that only last year you rode your first endurance race? How did this come about?

Well basically I had been suffering from some health problems and had been also using long-distance bikepacking as rehabilitation and “reappropriation” of my body. Signing up for an endurance race was a logical next step.

And how did it go?

I had studied the course before and prepared myself to try to finish it in about six days. I ended up finishing it in three days and a few hours. I was shocked to discover I could do this! To me it was amazing to discover what I was capable of, how the body could find ways to keep going, to handle pain, to use adrenaline. I was so proud and happy to achieve this. I didn’t care if I was the first one or last one over the line. I had discovered what I wanted to discover in a race against my body.

Had you any previous experience in competitive cycling?

No. In fact I have no previous experience in any kind of competitive sport. I never thought I was good at anything before this!

And how did you end up signing up to ride Badlands?

I actually decided during a ride, the Women’s Komoot Torino-Nice Rally, a great women’s only bikepacking ride. On one climb I started riding together with another girl, Sara, and we were really racing, going up fast, and at the top of the climb we said to each other we have to go do a race together and to us, because we both love gravel, Badlands seemed like the perfect race. At the time I actually had only ever done one endurance race so I was pretty scared by the idea. But now I have some more experience and I’m not scared!

What is your objective for Badlands?

To go as fast as I can!

So for you it’s a competition?

It’s not a competition against others, just an opportunity to do my best.

Last question: you have chosen to ride the carbon fiber Cinelli Zydeco King frame for the race… could you tell me a little bit about how you chose your exact setup for the bike?

Well, I’m a bit of a gearhead so I am very interested in lightweight solutions and I will try to go as light as possible because of the heat but at the same time I don’t want to run the risk of not being able to finish the race because my bag got ripped when I fell or I don’t have enough spare tubes… so really my build is all about striking a balance between lightweight solutions and neutralizing risk as for me my absolute first priority is finishing!

 

 

DAVIDE BELFIORE

 

 

Davide Belfiore, trade marketing manager of Cinelli, is our own endurance cycling guru. He has been riding his bike in extraordinary and unusual ways ever since we’ve known him. Last year he rode Badlands, broke his sternum and tore his rotator cuff and had to retire after 270km. This year he is going back with Taylor, Luisa and Sophie to resolve some unfinished business!

 

Davide, tell me about your history as a cyclist?

I grew up in Brianza and always rode my bike competitively, like so many other kids in the area. In 2002 I became a professional cyclist with the Sud Tirol team, I rode 3 seasons as a professional but to be honest the peloton was not a place I felt comfortable in during those years for many reasons that people now understand better!

And after that?

After that I hated the bike for quite a while and kept my distance… When I finally got back into cycling it was through Triathlon, where I found a much nicer atmosphere. There I was also able to compete at a high level and competed twice at 70.3 World Championships in Clearwater where I was the top Italian finisher. But in general, since stopping being a professional I’ve always had an approach to cycling which kept its distance from competition.

When did you start riding endurance races?

Only about three years ago, but that kind of cycling has always attracted me. Before I even knew about these kinds of races I was trying to invent them for myself. For example the last time I rode a triathlon, four years ago, the race was in Puglia so I decided to ride to the race from Cinelli. I left on Tuesday, rode 300km a day, arrived on Friday evening and raced the triathlon on Saturday…

What are you attracted to in endurance racing?

What I really enjoy is the experience of losing all the comforts of your regular life: your house, social media… Nothing is no longer in your possession other than the essentials: air, land, sky, your fatigue and your dreams. Riding these races is like a dream in which I carry most cherished memories with me. And this way of being produces visions for me, and ideas for life. It’s a kind of spiritual pursuit!

Follow our instagram profile @cinelli_official to stay updated!

Check out the King Zydeco and the Nemo Gravel that the riders will use to tame the desert!

We will hug again

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Dear friend,

how are you?

We are healthy and ready to start again, ensuring the safety of those who work with us.

Since the beginning of the lockdown, our technical, creative, commercial and administrative departments have been remote working, with meetings in virtual mode. Production has continued as long as permitted by government decrees.

Now, in view of May 4th, we are adapting the routes and processes to the needs of social distancing: we have reorganized the warehouse in order to be able to safely process orders and requests, and we are preparing to apply all the necessary procedures to ensure the safety and health of all those who enter the premises. Wherever possible, we will maintain the remote working mode to do our part for the collective well-being.

The athletes and Cinelli Ambassadors are making their personal contribution to solidarity projects, such as Paola Gianotti who has cycled for 12 hours in a row on rollers to buy devices for hospitals. Together with Marta Castronuovo of Yoga-à-Porter we created Cinelli Cares, the video yoga pills for the home training of cyclists. We organize meetups and rides on Zwift to maintain fitness and community spirit. With Becycling who quit their travel around the world after almost six years, we questioned the meaning travelling in Covid time, in an Instagram Cinelli Talk. Our athletes from Team Colpack Ballan, Energy Team, Team LVF, G.S. Stabbia, Deka Riders, Falasca MG.K Vis Luxor, Team Cinelli Smith, Army of two, Cinelli Chicks, Lovelo Squadra donne, Team Jadan, Sportcomplex Breclav, Velo ibike, Rush Cycles, Black Sox Bicycle Club are training professionaly with great commitment at home, communicating on social networks.

Now the most demanding challenge awaits us: to start again. But those who ride bikes are used to great challenges that require competence, renewal, teamwork, commitment, strength and sweat. We want to be close to our community of riders, to our dealers, to our distributors, in order to start again all together and to give our contribution to the cultural and commercial development of ourselves, of our partners and of the whole sector.

We want to promote the use of the bicycle as the main tool of the necessary social distancing to decongest urban mobility: the bicycle is an individual choice for the collective good. We want to dialogue with the other players in the sector and participate in the discussion tables, to give a strong and decisive new impetus to the bike industry. We want to promote incentives to buy a bike and use two wheels as a prevention tool. We want to support our partners and Ambassadors in road safety campaigns and for the reduction of VAT on bicycles. We want to participate in the construction of sustainable models of renewal that highlight the economic, ecological and health benefits of two wheels. We want to promote local cycling as the first engine for the rebirth of the territory.

We need to imagine new ways of living and living together. And to work. We are rethinking with new creative lymph to work models that previously worked but are no longer adequate: we must immediately transfer into daily life what we have learnt in recent months, demonstrating our resilience and intelligence in forging relationships and building new economies.

The lockdown has shown us the possibility of fully exploiting digital communication technologies, opening up space for immediate confrontation, abolishing downtime, showing ourselves to others even in our private daily lives. The invitation is to hold on to this gained closeness paradoxically dictated by the necessary distance, to work better together and dialogue in a new, empathic and effective way, creating a powerful human and professional connection.

Great stage races will be back, because bicycles have to run. And we will be there.
In the meantime, let’s get back on track together.

We are in touch

Antonio Colombo and Cinelli Team

Cinelli Cares

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This is the perfect season for cycling: days are getting longer, sun is warm but not hot, even the wind is gentler.
Unfortunately, however, the Coronavirus situation requires everybody to stay at home to safeguard the community health.
After the initial discouragement, virtual reality came to the rescue and now you can train with friends even staying at home.

To integrate and complete the indoor training Cinelli has created Cinelli Cares, a series of yoga classes specifically designed to complement the preparation of cyclists by working on strength and flexibility with the aim of improving performance on the pedals.

Marta Castronuovo will guide you into the deepest secrets of yoga for cyclists. Marta is yoga teacher and founder of Yoga à Porter, a school with the aim of offering a teacher who is not alienated from reality, closing herself in the minimalism of yoga centers, but who experiences and knows as much as possible the reality in which we live, spreading through the city, entering houses, small and large offices, co-working, such as bars or theaters and more.
In this sense, the kaleidoscopic education of Marta was fundamental. She graduated in Philosophy, Art and Anthropology, and blended them with extensive studies of Yoga, Chinese Medicine and Ayurveda.
For more information about Marta’s experiences, click here.

The first episode of Cinelli Cares will be published tomorrow, then every Tuesday and Friday, on the IGTV Cinelli Official channel.

Namasté!

Paola Gianotti against Covid-19

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Help our Ambassador Paola Gianotti to raise funds to buy thousands of masks for the Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital in Turin.

Paola auctioned her Cinelli Superstar disc from her third Guinness World Record, which saw her cross Japan in 2017 in nine days, from North to South. Place your bid!

On April 18th, the last day and boost of Paola’s campaign, donate and participate in the 12 hours on the rollers, cycling with Paola on Zwift and following the live on her Facebook page.

Or, donate now on gofundme.com/f/keepbrave-per-covid2019!

Go, Paola, go!

Cinelli x Tigran Avetisyan

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Cinelli mission has always been to look beyond the present, to reinvent the bicycle and make cyclists’ life better. Design principles are applied to all Cinelli products. Design is not just looks. Design means shape, first project, outline, technology, technique, materials, innovation, creativeness, function, quality, uniqueness, know-how, emotion. We want every product to have an Idea, since, if it is a copy, it cannot be Cinelli.
Today we express this Idea in the collaboration with Tigran Avetisyan, a Russian designer who studied at Central Saint Martins fashion school in London and had his final collection fully sponsored by LVMH.
Tigran is part of Wingedstore Cinelli Art program and his first cap will be online soon.
The designer’s stylistic and performing avant-garde has been developed in a streetwear collection with Cinelli and Columbus logos and will be sold through fashion distribution channels. The complete collection will be presented Sunday, January 12, 2020 from 6.00pm.
During the event, Tigran will do a live painting performance on a Vigorelli Shark with lenticular wheels kindly provided by Vision.

You are all invited!

Cinelli x Tigran Avetisyan
01.12.20 – h 6.00 pm
Riccardo Grassi showroom

Anima d’Acciaio opening video

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Anima d’acciaio continues until January 18th in the spaces of Antonio Colombo Gallery, in Milan.
And it continues to offer suggestions.

On Wednesday, December 4th, the famous American framebuilder Richard Sachs, stimulated by a sparkling Federico Meda, gave a speech on his fifty years of activity with Columbus tubes, together with Pietro Pietricola and Cristina Würdig, from Officina Dario Pegoretti, and our Paolo Erzegovesi from Columbus. Richard Sachs has brought with him Brian Vernor who is working on a documentary on RS that will be released in 2020.

Here a nice video of the exhibition opening evening.